International Development Law Organization

Honduras

English

Despite the substantial and steady decrease of murder rates in recent years, Honduras still faces grave security challenges. According to the National Autonomous University Observatory of Violence, the murder rate of the city of San Pedro Sula, the country's economic center, was 56,2 per 100.000 people in 2017, above the national average. Within the city, the neighborhoods of Chamelecón, Rivera Hernandez and Satélite are by far the most challenging, with limited police presence and strong impact of national gangs. The context of multisided violence has posed escalating security risks for women in their homes and on the streets. Domestic, intrafamilial and gender-based violence are constantly reported as some of the main causes of migration and internal displacement in the last decade. To address these issues, IDLO is supporting Honduras institutions through technical assistance to develop targeted legislation on the relevant topics and is working to reduce homicides through strengthened access to justice for women, children and other victims of violence.

Reducing Homicide - Reducir los homicidios

With a view to replacing a culture of violence in Honduras with one of legality, IDLO has outlined a program to reduce violent acts and homicides through better access to justice. Work, carried out in partnership with national institutions and civil society organizations, will focus specifically on vulnerable groups, including women, children, youth and people in detention.  The program is financed by the US Department of State. 

Expanding Membership for IDLO

Honduras, Mongolia and Pakistan have formally joined IDLO, taking the number of Member Parties to 30. The three countries were unanimously welcomed as IDLO Members at the organization's Assembly of Parties, currently underway at the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Rome. At the event, Irene Khan was confirmed as IDLO's Director-General for a second four-year term.

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Key Initiatives

  • The COVID-19 pandemic poses a significant threat to the right to food for populations, and especially for marginalized groups. In many countries, COVID-19 is intertwining with pre-existing factors affecting food security and nutrition, by limiting the access to affordable and nutritious food, including lack of economic opportunities, extreme weather conditions, ongoing conflicts and more.
  • With a view to replacing a culture of violence in Honduras with one of legality, IDLO has outlined a program to reduce violent acts and homicides through better access to justice. Work, carried out in partnership with national institutions and civil society organizations, will focus specifically on vulnerable groups, including women, children, youth and people in detention.  The program is financed by the US Department of State. 
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