International Development Law Organization

Mexico

As a large federation of 31 states and one federal district with the second-largest economy in Latin America, Mexico has historically made great strides in its democratic transition. Elections held in 2000 marked the first time since the 1910 Mexican Revolution that an opposition candidate defeated the party in government. And, successive administrations have made advances in reforming the economy and reducing extreme poverty.

Progress notwithstanding, challenges remain regarding economic inequality, drug trafficking, migration, organized crime, and corruption, including within security and police forces. In order to sustain its momentum, it is critical to support the rule of law in Mexico and build a culture of legality.

Supporting the rule of law in Mexico

Mexico has made significant efforts to modernize its justice and security system, and to strengthen the rule of law. The new accusatory system of justice, whereby the penal process is based on the presumption of innocence, has entered into force, and public policy measures have been taken for improved police professionalism. Despite these efforts, the public has little trust in the police force, and there is a widespread perception of impunity.

Key Initiatives

  • Mexico has made significant efforts to modernize its justice and security system, and to strengthen the rule of law. The new accusatory system of justice, whereby the penal process is based on the presumption of innocence, has entered into force, and public policy measures have been taken for improved police professionalism. Despite these efforts, the public has little trust in the police force, and there is a widespread perception of impunity.

Subscribe to RSS - Mexico