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Knowledge Café: Rule of Law Contributions to the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Guided by leading experts, this 'Knowledge Café' provides participants with an opportunity to discuss practical ways in which the rule of law contributes to specific dimensions of sustainable development, and to participate in an interactive dialogue on how this contribution should be incorporated into the post-2015 development agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

LEAHN Consultation on Police and HIV

IDLO is co-organizing a consultation on Police and HIV to be held in conjunction with the 2nd Law Enforcement and Public Health Conference in Amsterdam in October. The consultation is being convened by the Law Enforcement and HIV Network (LEAHN), and is being co-organized along with the Centre for Law Enforcement and Public Health and Birkbeck School of Law at the University of London.

Feeding the Planet: Empowering Women

The Governments of Italy, Ghana, World Food Programme and International Development Law Organization, in collaboration with UN Women, will organize a high-level event under the title on “Feeding the Planet – Empowering Women: The Food and Nutrition Security Challenge”, to support the mainstreaming of gender equality in food and nutrition security.

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Key Initiatives

  • Achieving Justice For All
  • In 2015, IDLO and Majority World launched an international photography exhibition about justice, the rule of law and sustainable development called 'In Focus: Justice and the Post-2015 Agenda'. Click here to visit the In Focus: Justice and the Post-2015 Agenda micro-site to read information about the exhibition, learn more about the photographers and view the images.
  • Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) kill 15 million people between the ages of 30 and 69, and over 86 per cent of these "premature" deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.The economic impact, including loss of income by people harmed by NCDs, the costs of treatment, and the impacts on families threaten international development. Through regulation and fiscal reforms, countries can promote healthy diets, physical activity, and other initiatives reducing the prevalence and harms of NCDs. 
  • Growing insecurity and instability, recurring and protracted conflict and violence, increasing inequality, exclusion and discrimination, deterioration of international human rights and humanitarian norms, all signal the importance of strengthening the rule of law in today’s rapidly changing world. Notably, Goal 16 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development seeks to promote peace, justice and strong institutions.
  • As part of IDLO’s continuous commitment to accountability and results-based management, IDLO is pleased to share this Evaluation Brief (summarised evaluation report): “Capacity Building Programme To Support The Implementation Of The Nagoya Protocol”. The evaluation has been conducted by independent evaluation experts, supervised by IDLO’s Evaluation Unit.
  • Under this new Programme, IDLO will provide support to LDC governments and businesses by enlisting experts to assist beneficiaries in preparing for and conducting negotiations and participating in arbitral proceedings or alternative dispute resolution methods. The Programme will also arrange complementary training and capacity building activities on demand.
  • The agricultural sector in low income countries has suffered from serious underinvestment for decades, with considerable consequences for long-term food security. The investment needed to eradicate hunger by 2030 has been estimated at US$1.5 billion annual additional investments per year, of which US$276 million is required for rural development and agriculture.
  • Dealing with ecosystem degradation has long been seen as the purview of environmentalists alone. With the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), biodiversity has been recognized as essential to human resilience and economic opportunity, and its preservation requires action from all sectors of society.
  • The entry into force of the Nagoya Protocol in 2014 represented a major milestone in the global commitment to promote access and benefit sharing (ABS) of the use of genetic resources in a fair and equitable way. As of August 2017, 100 Parties in the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) had ratified the Nagoya Protocol, and many now need to adopt national measures to operationalize it at the domestic level.
  • World leaders have committed to ending AIDS by 2030 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals, but stigma and discrimination remain significant obstacles. In particular, police are critical, front-line determinants of risk for many people living with HIV (PLHIV) and members of other key affected populations (KAPs). The negative impact of adverse police behaviors and practices on HIV risk is well documented, and these risks undermine global efforts to end AIDS. Far less well documented, and less common, are attempts to ameliorate this impact by working to change police behaviors.
  • IDLO is tackling this challenge of FS with partners in the World Bank’s Global Forum on Law, Justice and Development. A consortium led by the Organization will develop an assessment tool to assist strengthen national legal frameworks to respond to this emerging challenge. The tool will be tested in Uganda in the course of 2015.
  • In 2014 IDLO signed agreements with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) to build legal capacity to address public health challenges. The initial focus is on obesity, diabetes, healthy diets and physical activity. Also in 2014, IDLO, the WHO and the University of Sydney convened the first regional consultation on overweight, obesity, diabetes and law in the Western Pacific.
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