Ukraine

Ukraine has embarked on a wide-ranging process of reform. Much of the region’s future stability depends on success in this 45-million strong, former Soviet republic. The momentum is there to overcome a legacy of bureaucratic stagnation, arbitrariness and corruption. But efforts to complete the transition to a modern, prosperous state must contend with a crippling economic crisis and the persistence of conflict in the east of the country. As of 2015, IDLO is working at both the national and regional level to facilitate justice sector reform and promote integrity.

We particularly focus on criminal justice reforms, which are critical to strengthening of the rule of law and democratic institutions in Ukraine. Our work is aligned with Ukraine’s own laws and policies – chiefly the National Justice Sector Reform Strategy, the amended Law on the Public Prosecutor’s Office and the Deregulation Strategy – as well as with Ukraine’s international obligations on combatting corruption.  

Building the capacity of bailiffs

Since the Maidan Revolution of 2013-2014, Ukraine has worked to reform the judiciary, including the judgement enforcement system for commercial matters. As in many transition countries, non-enforcement of commercial court decisions in Ukraine remains a key problem, affecting not only investor confidence, but also the functioning of the entire judiciary.

Empowering civil society for reform

Civil society in Ukraine is well organized and able to exert considerable influence, especially since the Maidan Revolution. It is widely agreed that targeted support for civil society organizations (CSOs) can amplify the success of reforms that strengthen the rule of law and eliminate corruption. With this is mind, we are working to empower CSOs to monitor and engage with the current reform processes in public administration, rule of law and justice sectors.

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Key Initiatives

  • Since the Maidan Revolution of 2013-2014, Ukraine has worked to reform the judiciary, including the judgement enforcement system for commercial matters. As in many transition countries, non-enforcement of commercial court decisions in Ukraine remains a key problem, affecting not only investor confidence, but also the functioning of the entire judiciary.

  • Civil society in Ukraine is well organized and able to exert considerable influence, especially since the Maidan Revolution. It is widely agreed that targeted support for civil society organizations (CSOs) can amplify the success of reforms that strengthen the rule of law and eliminate corruption. With this is mind, we are working to empower CSOs to monitor and engage with the current reform processes in public administration, rule of law and justice sectors.

  • While acknowledging the importance of national reform efforts, our program in Ukraine emphasizes and assists regional reform initiatives. We are helping develop and implement the reform agenda launched in Odessa, in an effort to position the Black Sea region as Ukraine’s de facto anti-corruption capital.

  • In Ukraine, as in most post-Soviet states, the role of the Public Prosecutor is oversized in relation to the Judiciary and the rest of the legal community. The institution is historically prone to abuse of power and corruption, and skewed towards protecting the interests of the state over those of society or the individual. Regard for human rights is scant; fair trial standards are rarely applied. As a consequence, public dissatisfaction is rife. Current political will to change the system has opened up an opportunity for meaningful reform.

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